Rowan Blanchard isn’t your typical Disney princess. After releasing a three part Instagram post on modern feminism, she’s become one of the major voices of our generation. She addressed white privilege, the wage gap, and internet sexism. Elle Magazine described her post as “eloquent, sophisticated, and straight to the point.” Oh and did we mention Rowan is only 14?

Here are 10 things you need to know about Rowan Blanchard

 

On her career

Rowan Blanchard currently plays the role of Riley Matthews on “Girl Meets World”, a spin-off of the original “Boy Meets World”. However this is not her first rodeo. She started acting when she was five years old, has also appeared in another Disney show, “Dance-A-Lot Robot”, and played Rebecca Wilson in “Spy Kids: All the Time in the World”.

On the pressures of being a child star

Growing up isn’t easy and being in the spotlight makes it even harder. Rowan put a lot of pressure on herself because everyone kept on warning her not to mess up. Now she’s realized that she has to live her life for herself. Rowan says now she feels like “if I mess up with one thing, I can kind of look back on it and just be like, ‘All right, well, that was a nice try, and at least you tried’.”

On making friends

Being an actress at a young age is hard; Rowan had trouble making friends because she felt like the kids at school were only pretending to like her. It was only after, when she discovered other hobbies, that she met people with whom she shared common interests.

On being scared of other girls

Rowan wasn’t one of the cool kids in middle school. She says, “in middle school there was literally a spot for the cool kids to sit. You could only sit there if you were cool, and I wasn’t.” Instead of hanging out with other girls, she would go read by herself. She says she felt intimidated by them, feeling that they were “scary and mean.” But now Rowan says, “finding female friendship was such a monumental point in my life. And I never want somebody to feel like they have to re-evaluate themselves to join my friends or to join any friend-group.”

On who she looks up to

Rowan is friends with Tavi Gevinson and we’d say the two are kindred spirits as both are extremely inspirational young women. Rowan says she also looks up to Elle Fanning; she loves her style because she can wear high end designers without looking over the top.

On how she started writing about feminism

It all started when Rowan was twelve and she was waiting with a friend for her dad to pick them up after a movie. Minding their own business, they were shocked when a grown man walked up to them asking if they needed a ride anywhere. Rowan says that it was a surreal moment, it was at this point that she realized that girls get cat called all the time. She started writing about it and gaining a following. She wants to get the word out so that other girls don’t have to ever go through that. She says there’s nothing you can do “except endure it and try and speak about it.”

On her writing style

Rowan is only a teenager and doesn’t aspire to write like a PhD student. She says that the things that have impacted her the most are written by people closer to her age, like Tavi. Her goal is to make her writing accessible to young people so that they like they’re not alone.

On her fashion style

While Rowan might have access to high fashion, she is cautious of looking like she’s trying too hard. She wants her style to be sophisticated and youthful, chic but appropriate. Rowan says, “Honestly I’m in no hurry to wear anything sexy. Not even for Halloween!”

On being a feminist and loving fashion

Elle Magazine asked Rowan Blanchard if you could be a feminist and still love fashion, to which Rowan said “Absolutely! Come on!” But she does go on to say that women on the red carpet should be asked about what projects they’re working on instead of their dresses, like their male co-stars are. Rowan says, “Don’t make my story and who I am, be my dress, while my male co-stars story is how he picks scripts and gets inspired.” She says that while it’s ok to ask her on the red carpet what she’s wearing, she should also be asked about her work and her life. “We shouldn’t be taken less seriously because we’re in dresses… At the end of the day, it’s about equality.”

On dieting

Someone once asked Rowan if she had any diet tips for other teenage girls, to which she said “I don’t diet! I’m thirteen. Nobody my age should be dieting or trying to change themselves because society says so. And seriously, I’m thirteen! The only ‘dieting tip’ I have is, like, “if you don’t order fries, you’ll probably be mad.”